Tag Archives: Croatia

How is Your Serbo-Croat? Special Collections Needs Volunteers!

Dimitrije Mitrinović was born in what is now Bosnia-Herzegovina, into a Serbian speaking family. He learned to speak and write in multiple languages as a young man and today his Archive reflects his “multi-lingualism”. This is particularly true of the letters in the collection. So far I have catalogued material in German, French, Russian, Italian and, of course, Serbo-Croat.

Unfortunately I don’t have Mitrinović’s knowledge of languages, which is where you come in! Special Collections is looking for volunteers to help us to catalogue correspondence from his Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian friends, colleagues and family to the same standard as we’ve established for letters in English.

NAF 1-8-3-1 Postcard, front                 NAF 1-8-3-1 Postcard, back

Dimitrije Mitrinović created, edited and wrote for influential journals and magazines in Serbia, Croatia and subsequently, Yugoslavia. He knew some of the region’s most learned, famous (and infamous) and artistic citizens including Gavrilo Princip and Ivan Meštrović. If you have a knowledge of the Serbian or Croatian language and an interest in history, this could be just the project for you! And you don’t have to live near Bradford, as we’ll supply you with copies to work from and training.

Please email e.l.burgham@bradford.ac.uk to find out more and register your interest.

NAF 1-8-3-7 Letter, front [pink]

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Chasing Away the January Blues: Postcards in the Archive

Apparently, we’ve just passed Blue Monday, supposedly the most depressing day of the year. Christmas holidays feel long gone, but the bills are turning up. It’s colder, still dark and New Year’s resolutions may by now be discarded. However many of us refuse to be defeated and turn to the prospect of summer holidays to give ourselves something to look forward to, and fortunately we can find a little inspiration in the Mitrinović Archive.

NAF 6-5-3, Postcard of Dubrovnik, Boat on the Water c1920s NAF 6-5-3, Postcard of Dubrovnik with peasant women, c1920s

These charming postcards show us Dubrovnik in, I believe, the 1920s. They were hidden in a folder entitled “Photographs”, so we had no idea that they (and others like them) were there. The photos in the collection are nearly all black and white, so it was a treat to find a splash of colour. The images remind me a bit of Mitsumasa Anno‘s beautiful children’s book illustrations, with their detailed scenery populated with tiny people going about their business.

NAF 6-5-3, Postcard of Dubrovnik, c1920s, 1

The postcards in this case are blank, and were seemingly bought and kept by Dimitrije Mitrinović (or one of his friends), as a souvenir of a holiday in Yugoslavia. I hope that they’ve brought a little bit of the sunny Adriatic coast to our readers here too. And – as a bonus – fans of Game of Thrones might just be struck by a sense of familiarity, as Dubrovnik now plays the part of the fictional King’s Landing.

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Designs for a Flag

NAF1-2-5 Design for a Flag - Collage

Most of the files in the Mitrinović collection are full of documents, typewritten, printed or manuscript, covering all sorts of interesting subjects but not necessarily the most visual of items. So finding a file of colourful little paintings and collages was a treat! These bright designs are seemingly for a new Yugoslavian flag for the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, as the new country was officially called from its foundation in 1918 until 1929, when the name ‘Kingdom of Yugoslavia’ was officially adopted. A note accompanying the designs shows how Dimitrije Mitrinović incorporated colours associated with Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia and Bulgaria.

NAF1-2-5 Design for Flag DM's Notes    NAF1-2-5 Design for a Flag 1

Mitrinović felt strongly that peace could be achieved through Yugoslavian, European and, ultimately, world federation.  We might speculate that for him the flag designs symbolised a peaceful, self-governing country embracing its diversity and free of the yoke of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires with their ‘divide and conquer’ approach to the Balkans. Tragically, as we know, the united Yugoslavia was not to solve the region’s problems, although perhaps the European Union may have met with some approval from Mitrinović. He might have seen it as a positive force for peace in the Balkans, as in the rest of the continent, fostering positive co-existence. Certainly Mitrinović viewed a federated Europe as highly desirable and the first step to a united world.

For those interested in finding out more, Serbian academic Dušan Pajin of the University of Art, Belgrade, wrote an article for the journal Serbian Studies, Dimitrije Mitrinović and the European Union Project’ published in 2008 comparing Mitrinović’s ideas of a united Europe with the reality of the E.U. in 1998. (Available to download free here). No doubt as I catalogue his papers here at Bradford, more of Mitrinović’s thoughts on the subject will be accessible and will repay further study.
As many people are trying to assess the value and purposes of the E.U., to reform it or leave it altogether, it seems timely to revisit the kind of thinking that led to its creation in the first place. For many like Dimitrije Mitrinović, seeing how imperial ambitions and simmering ethnic tensions could divide peoples and erupt into violence, a unitary authority founded on co-operation seemed the only way to ensure peace and prosperity. These cheerful little flags seem to me to capture some of that optimism and belief that change was possible.
NAF1-2-5 Design for Flag 2

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Mapping the First World War, Map of the Southern Slav Territory 1915

NAF 1-2-3 Map of Southern Slav Territory 1915

One of the first items I’ve come across that really caught my eye since starting to catalogue the Mitrinović archive is a fascinating map of the Balkans. Entitled Map of the Southern Slav Territory and created by Dr. Niko Županić (1876-1961), this remarkable document was published in 1915, as the First World War was raging. It was commissioned by the ‘Jugoslav Committee in London’, represented by ex-pats including Dimitrije Mitrinović. The map shows the range of ethnic and cultural groups in the region – Serbs, Croatians, Slovenes, etc. and the degree to which all of these groups were intermingled. It also shows who held what territory at the time – a snapshot of the political and military situation. Who was the intended audience? Was it used in support of a goal close to Mitrinović’s heart – the establishment of a federal Yugoslavia?

NAF 1-2-3 Map of Southern Slav Territory - Key - Cropped

Prior to the war, Dimitrije Mitrinović became an important figure in the Young Bosnia movement, a nationalist group struggling against the Austro-Hungarian empire, seeking a moral and cultural rebirth amongst the Southern Slavic peoples. Within this group Mitrinović’s ideas were an influence on Gavrilo Princip, as both held anti-imperialist views. Where they differed strongly was on the use of violence. Mitrinović devoted his life to creating a new, peaceful world order. He believed that radical change was needed urgently, but that people should be brought to towards it on an individual level, and of their own free will.

Dimitrije Mitrinović was living in Germany just before war was declared in August 1914. He found himself caught – a return home would have seen him drafted into the Austro-Hungarian forces, fighting for an empire he had always protested against, or (more likely) imprisoned for his beliefs and political activities. He took a decision to come to London instead and would remain in England for the rest of his life.

With commemorations of the start of the Great War going on everywhere at the moment, this map is a timely discovery. Although our collections here at the University of Bradford are stronger on war – and especially peace and pacifism – of later years, this map also hints at the presence of other First World War material awaiting discovery in our collections.

NAF 1-2-3 Map of Southern Slav Territory - Detail

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